In a recent interview with Glamour magazine, Anna Kendrick talks openly about the sexism that exists in the casting process of the Hollywood film industry. When Glamour’s correspondent poised the question, “How are actresses treated differently than actors?” She responded,

Image result for Anna Kendrick“There’s [a film I’m considering] now where I have to wait for all the male roles to be cast before I can even become a part of the conversation. Part of me gets that. [But] part of me is like, “What the f–k? You have to cast for females based on who’s cast as males?” To me, the only explanation is that there are so many f–king talented girls, and from a business standpoint it’s easier to find women to match the men. I totally stand by the belief that there are 10 unbelievably talented women for every role.”

She also states that, though the roles are limited, it doesn’t mean that makes women more competitive.
“If anything, it bonds you because we’re all dealing with the same problem.”

Another example of how Anna is paving the way with regards to women’s  representation is through refusing to do a “sexy pose” on the film cover shoot for Pitch Perfect. Feminist scholars have well catalogued the way advertisers convey messaging with simple body posture and composition of visual media. A great documentary series called “Killing Us Softly” series and if you are interested in learning more about this, you should check it out.  Whether you’ve watched the documentaries, it’s easy to stare at any magazine wrack. We see countless covers of magazines and movie posters with women dawning poses that seems to infantilize them. You can also get a laugh by looking at men who purposefully copy the poses women are expected to do in order to highlight how ridiculous it is. In a culture that sexualizes, infantilizes and objectifies women as a norm, it often takes this role reversal to show us the ridiculousness of something we have become desensitized to.

Image result for pose like women

The timid body posture of a woman is often sexualized in these mediums. It correlates to rape culture and the perceived “helplessness of a woman.” So when Anna chose a Boss stance over a sexualized pose, she cause concern. Anna stuck to her gut, did things her own way and it paid off!

#BOSSPitch started trending on twitter with hundreds of fans posing with the poster showing off their own assertive- boss like poses.
In response, Anna tweeted:

The full interview is available in this months Glamour Magazine, where Anna talks more about refusing to be sexualized on film cover shots and talks and shares continues her willingness to share her experiences of sexism as a hollywood actress.

Plus, personally, I find her down to earth vibe- completely refreshing.

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